palatable

palatable, appetizing, savory, sapid, tasty, toothsome, flavorsome, relishing mean agreeable or pleasant to the taste.
Palatable is not emphatic in its implication of pleasantness; therefore it seldom suggests deliciousness and often, on the other hand, implies little more than acceptability
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provide palatable meals for her family

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the root, when properly cooked, was converted into a palatable and nutritious food— Pre scott

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The term is used frequently of things which are mentally digested
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the rebuke was not palatable

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I'm afraid that my remarks have not been very palatable, but I can assure you that they were sincerely meant— Mackenzie

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Appetizing implies a whetting of the appetite; it is applicable to the smell and appearance as well as to the taste of food
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the appetizing odor of a roasting turkey

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a convalescent requires appetizing meals

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In its extended use the word is applicable to things that stimulate a desire for more or an eagerness to go further
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an appetizing introduction to a subject

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the journalist with a nose for appetizing frontpage tidbits— Zirato

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Savory, also, is applied to foods that have an agreeable odor as well as taste, but it conveys definite implications of piquancy; it is therefore applied to highly seasoned dishes as contrasted with sweet or bland dishes
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a bland meat sometimes needs a savory sauce

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a savory stuffing for the turkey

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In extended use savory may suggest a pleasantly stimulating and agreeable quality
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engaging books . . . neither autobiography, nor fiction, nor essays, but a savory mixture of all three—TV. Y. Times

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but more often than not it is used in negative construction or with ironic implications
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the conquest of the West . . . is not among the more savory chapters in American history— Agnew

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Sapid is an uncommon and chiefly technical term that primarily applies to a substance able to stimulate taste receptors
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assuming that the sapid substance . . . initiates the electrical depolarization of the taste cell— Beidler

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In general use it may imply a marked taste or flavor
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a sapid dish

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or in extended use one that is distinctly keen or exhilarating
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a sapid and antiseptic quality of bright intelligence— Ellis

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Tasty implies a marked taste, but it suggests in addition an appetizing quality
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a tasty morsel

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a tasty cheese

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many trees, like the caju, which produce tasty fruits— P. E. James

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tasty ingredients for a good, breezy book— Barrett

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Toothsome heightens the implication of agreeableness in palatable and may add the suggestion of tenderness or of daintiness
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a toothsome dessert

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one of the most toothsome chicken dinners you'll ever munch— Gelston Hardy

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Flavorsome usually suggests richness rather than sharpness of taste, and often implies fragrance as well as savor
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flavorsome apricots

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incredibly flavorsome wild mushrooms from the forests— Davenport

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Relishing stresses gusto in enjoyment
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he found all this praise extremely relishing

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find ways in which the soldier's food could be made more relishing— Current Biog.

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Analogous words: *delightful, delicious, delectable, luscious: piquant, *pungent, spicy
Antonyms: unpalatable: distasteful

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • palatable — This does not seem especially business related. pal‧at‧a‧ble [ˈpælətəbl] adjective if a suggestion, offer, proposal etc is made palatable, it is changed so that people will accept it and approve of it: • The proposal was engineered as a more… …   Financial and business terms

  • Palatable — Pal a*ta*ble, a. [From {Palate}.] Agreeable to the palate or taste; savory; hence, acceptable; pleasing; as, palatable food; palatable advice. Opposite of {unpalatable}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • palatable — I adjective acceptable, agreeable, ambrosial, ambrosian, amenable, appetizing, becoming, causing pleasure, cibarious, comestible, congenial, delectable, delicate, delicious, delightful, drinkable, dulcet, dulcis, eatable, edible, enjoyable,… …   Law dictionary

  • palatable — ● palatable adjectif Se dit d un aliment qui procure une sensation agréable lors de sa consommation …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • palatable — (adj.) 1660s, good tasting, from PALATE (Cf. palate) + ABLE (Cf. able). Figurative use from 1680s. Related: Palatability …   Etymology dictionary

  • palatable — [adj] delicious, agreeable acceptable, A OK*, aperitive, appetizing, attractive, cool, copacetic, delectable, delightful, divine, enjoyable, fair, flavorsome, good tasting, heavenly, home cooking*, luscious, mellow, mouthwatering, peachy,… …   New thesaurus

  • palatable — ► ADJECTIVE 1) pleasant to taste. 2) (of an action or proposal) acceptable. DERIVATIVES palatability noun palatably adverb …   English terms dictionary

  • palatable — [pal′it ə bəl] adj. [ PALAT(E) + ABLE] 1. pleasant or acceptable to the taste; fit to be eaten or drunk 2. acceptable to the mind palatability n. palatableness palatably adv …   English World dictionary

  • palatable — palatability, palatableness, n. palatably, adv. /pal euh teuh beuhl/, adj. 1. acceptable or agreeable to the palate or taste; savory: palatable food. 2. acceptable or agreeable to the mind or feelings: palatable ideas. [1660 70; PALATE + ABLE]… …   Universalium

  • palatable — pal|at|a|ble [ˈpælətəbəl] adj 1.) palatable food or drink has a pleasant or acceptable taste ≠ ↑unpalatable ▪ a very palatable wine 2.) an idea, suggestion etc that is palatable is acceptable ≠ ↑unpalatable palatable to ▪ They changed the wording …   Dictionary of contemporary English

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